Picture-perfect Paris – A weekend shooting in the streets – Fuji x100 Firmware 2

Hi gang,

Just made it back from a quick 3-day weekend in Paris. We were out celebrating my grandma’s 80th birthday with the family.
Paris is always a lovely city to come home to. The lights, the pitoresque streets, the Seine, the cathedrals, the bistros, the boulevards, everything really. You’ll just have to live with the traffic I guess. There is a reason world-famous photographers like Cartier-Bresson, Brassai lived here and contemporary photographers like Jay Maisel and Bill Cunningham keep returning here over and over again.

Looking at the Louvre

Looking at the Louvre

Evidently, cleared two days for some much needed street photography. Paris, like any major city in the world lends itself perfectly to street photography. I’m a big advocate of shooting the city or place you live in, because every aspect can be interesting. However, in order for your streetphotography to be interesting, your subject matter needs to be interesting. Subject matter, evidently, are the people or things you photograph. If you live in a place that has very few, to no people, you’re going to have a bad time for street photography. That being said, photographers like William Eggleston have had incredible careers photographing the mundane everyday life. But this post is about street photography.

Paul's backdoor?

Paul’s backdoor?

The thing with Paris, like New York, Shangai, or any other major city in the world is that no matter where you go, there is always something happening. Every corner, subway outlet, street there is someone or something interesting. Like they say, if you line up 10 bottles on the wall instead of 1, there’s ten times the chance to hit something.

HERE

HERE, Paris, November 2013

As I said, there’s always something happening. When I’m in Paris I love to walk everywhere. Best thing to do is to take a map or open up Google Maps and locate ten hotspots in the city. Draw out a route you can follow. Why work like this? Worst case scenario, you’ll see the top spots of the town. Best possible scenario? You get some truly wonderful shots. Not of those hotspots, but of the people near them. Remember, human interaction will always best a standard picture of the Eiffel tower, no matter how pretty it looks. Remember, it is the people in your pictures making them.

Color Curiosity

Color Curiosity

We had lunch at the world-famous Café de la Paix, near the Opéra Garnier in Paris. This grand café as they call them is wonderful. The inside decoration takes you back to the roaring twenties. You can just too easily imagine yourself sitting there sipping some Veuve-Clicquot next to Scott F. Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein. Think a lot of golden arches, deep green velvet chairs, red benches and waiters in tuxedo’s. The works. If you’re ever in the neighborhood, take some time to sip an espresso (and not an eXpresso like you’ll see in a lote of Parisian cafés)
There is just something soothing in sitting there, sipping a delicious espresso, observing people and contemplating life. Sometimes, its the small things that count.

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A “café de la Paix” espresso

Red Chair, Café de la Paix

Another thing that’s lovely to do is strolling along the Seine river on the Bords de Seine. They close them down to traffic during the day so that people can stroll along there.

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One thing I looked forward to is testing the newly released firmware 2.0 for the Fuji X100 I blogged about in my previous post. After a large weekend of testing I can happily say that the upgrades are really worth it. The AF performance is crazy fast for the X100. It bothered me from time to time but I learned to live around it. Now, it’s just amazingly fast. The people that still complain are to me people that would never have gotten into photography in the first place if they had started 10 or 30 years ago. There was no AF 30 years ago. The first AF on the D100 was miles slower than the X100 is now so there is just no complaining to be done on this part.

White in Black

A nice addtion was the improved close-up distance without entering macro-mode. I don’t use it often, but when I need to use it, I realize it too late and have to remove my eye , enter the menu and so on. The thing is, they improved the distance by some 30% and that’s like enough most of the time. To me, that’s fantastic. The close-up shot of the espresso cup was made in this mode.

The Morning Shift

Sadly, as it often tends to be in November the skies were laden with rain and bad weather. It rained every.single.day. However, like the legendary Bill Cunningham says :”Rain changes the game completely. People who usually try to look their best walking about the streets are now to distracted by trying to escape the rain.” It creates reflections. Moody situations. Shadows.

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So that sums it up about. Amazing weekend, some good shots, saw Paris again which is always good. New firmware 2.0 of the X100 has been thoroughly tested and heartily approved.

Take care, and don’t forget to just walk out of the door. It’s half the work for street photography. The other half is taking your camera with you and observing life.

Cheers,

M

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5 thoughts on “Picture-perfect Paris – A weekend shooting in the streets – Fuji x100 Firmware 2

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  3. Pingback: miXed zone: XQ1 in stock for $439, save $160 on X100S, X-E2 and 23mm reviews… and more! | Fuji Rumors

  4. Hi…When we talk of AF speeds normally we compare the camera against its peers not of generation old camera. The100s or the XE1 speeds may have improved but still no where near the speed of a Olympus EP5 or OMD.. I have a EM5 and having used it I feel the XE2 is quite slow..

    • Hi Ramesh!
      I understand what you are saying, but AF-Speed is technically relative, because at a certain point we will have reached maximum AF speed obtainable. After that it will be predictive AF, but that is something for the future :)
      The point I am trying to make here is that the X100 pre-Firmware 2 had real problems with AF speed. Now, with FW2 it is up to par. It might not be the fastest in the segment or its class, but it is really usable. People forget that photography is not supposed to be easy. Automization of everything on a camera is something bad to me, it makes you think less about the important stuff in photography.

      The essence of this post was that even with an AF that is not the best in its class, it is still miles ahead of what was available 10 years ago. This post is not about the technical qualities of the X system in general, but more about the universal concept of AF in photography.

      Cheers!

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